Speak Up for Archaeology – ‘Planning for the Future’ White Paper

The Council for British Archaeology and the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists have released a joint statement regarding their initial response to the ‘Planning for the Future’ white paper consultation. Both bodies are concerned that the white paper in its current form is insufficient to protect archaeological interests within the planning process. You can read more about the initial response from the Council for British Archaeology on the following link.https://new.archaeologyuk.org/news/cba-and-cifa-response-to-planning-white-paper

More information and a message from CBA Executive Director Neil Redfern is available on the link below. https://blog.archaeologyuk.org/2020/07/22/cba-writes-to-pm-and-ministers-on-proposed-planning-reforms/

It is important that our voices are heard at this time and we would encourage you to ‘Speak up for Archaeology’ and send an email to your MP to ask that archaeology is protected in the planning process.

You can find out who your MP is and how to contact them on this website: https://members.parliament.uk/FindYourMP

There is a very helpful guide about writing a letter or email to your MP on the Council for British Archaeology website here: https://new.archaeologyuk.org/Content/downloads/8149_2020%20Toolkit%206%20-%20Writing%20to%20your%20local%20Councillor%20or%20MP.pdf

You can also find a copy of an email sent by a CBA NW member to their MP about this issue.

You can also find a copy of an email sent by a CBA NW member to their MP about this issue.

COUNCIL FOR BRITISH ARCHAEOLOGY LATEST COVID-19 ADVICE FOR LOCAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETIES

Excavations at the canal workshops on Worsley Green, July 2019. Image courtesy of Dr Michael Nevell.

The Council for British Archaeology (CBA) has issued advice for local archaeology societies and community groups keen to resume fieldwork and/or face-to-face activities. At the moment they cannot provide archaeology-specific guidance so are advising that societies and groups follow the UK Government’s 5 step guide to working safely. This provides a useful starting point when thinking about how to organise activities and events. The steps covered are:

  1. Carrying out a Covid-19 risk assessment: The UK Government website has links to HSE guidance on risk assessments.
  2. Developing cleaning, handwashing, and hygiene procedures: The UK Government has provided some general guidance on cleaning in non-healthcare settings outside the home.  
  3. Helping people to work from home: In terms of fieldwork and events, this is a good point to think about and discuss the practicalities of bringing people together again. If safely meeting face-to-face is going to be difficult at the moment are there opportunities for your members to do any activities individually, in very small groups, or would your members be interested in some social activities or events online?
  4. Maintaining 2m social distancing, where possible: You will need to think about the implications of this in terms of the type of activity you are planning and if you are planning an indoor event what implications this will have on the number of participants and the suitability of your venue. The UK Government has produced some guidance on the use of multi-purpose community facilities.
  5. And where people cannot be 2m apart, managing the transmission risk: Check the relevant government guidance for your country/region regarding managing transmission and the use of PPE and face coverings

Further details and individual links to Government guidance can be found here:

https://new.archaeologyuk.org/news/news-returning-to-activities-following-covid-19

NWRRF Research Questions Added

Although archaeology, like most of Britain, remains in lockdown during April 2020, that does not mean that all is still and quiet. We continue to work on the North West Regional Research Framework (NWRRF) for the Historic Environment. Beta testing for the new wiki website is imminent and editing of the point-in-time monograph continues even if we can not launch it this spring (our May conference is cancelled and posting the volume is not appropriate at this time).

However, ahead of the wiki website going live we are making available the 400+ research questions for the project. The wiki will contain a fuller version with the research agenda included. The questions are arranged by period and can be found here:

https://archaeologynorthwest.wordpress.com/period-updates/

 

 

Keeping up-to-date with NWRRF Project

Over the past few months we have continued to work on developing the North West Regional Research Framework update project for the Historic Environment. The project itself has been extended to include an interactive testing and training phase which will run into 2021 and there are three strands we would like to brief you on.

Firstly, the Wiki website which will be the primary interactive source of online information for the new research framework. This will be available for Beta Testing soon, hopefully in April 2020. Until then this website will be updated to include the latest versions of the Research Questions.

Secondly, we are completing a point-in-time monograph that will summarise the Historic Environment research undertaken in the North West of England between 2006 and 2019. The intention was to launch this at the Spring meeting of CBA North West. Although that meeting almost certainly can not now take place due to the COVD-19 crisis the publication will still progress, and we will post details later in the Spring. The original research framework monographs, published in 2006 and 2007, are be available to download from this website.

Thirdly, we have arranged a series of training seminars on how to use the new Wiki website. Unfortunately, again due to the COVID-19 crisis, we are not able to deliver these in person. Instead we are compiling an online training package for download and use. This will be ready in April in 2020.

Don’t forget that the original North West Regional Research Framework volumes from 2006 and 2007 are still current. They can be downloaded from here:

https://archaeologynorthwest.wordpress.com/about/north-west-regional-research-for-archaeology-1-0/

Keep clicking back for more updates.

Archaeology North West 2019 Conference

HoghtonTowerAug18 (5)Its that time of year again when we round up all the latest research and finds from across the North West. This year’s Archaeology North West conference, and our AGM, will have a Cheshire theme, with talks on aerial photography in the county, Murgatroyd’s brine Pump and a tour of the centre of historic Nantwich with its wonderful array of timber buildings. The Peter Lange Memorial Lecture will be given by Sarah Cattell, who will be talking about the recent community dig at Hoghton Tower in Lancashire. Liz Stewart of Liverpool Museums will discuss the survey and excavation of Liverpool’s last surviving courtyard housing.  The day will begin with our AGM (and we are always looking for committee volunteers).

The venue is Elim Church and Olive Grove Conference Centre in Nantwich (CW5 6LW) and online booking can be found here as well as on our events pages:

https://cba-archaeologynw-agm2019.eventbrite.co.uk

The Programme is as follows:

9.30: Registration, tea & coffee
10.00: CBA North West AGM
10.30: Peter Lange Memorial Lecture “Lancashire Summertime; Excavations at Rhyddings Park and Hoghton Tower” – Sarah Cattell, Salford Archaeology
11.10: “Excavating ‘Little Hell’” – Dr Liz Stewart, Liverpool Museums
11.40: “Recent archaeological work in Cheshire” – Kirsty Lloyd, Planning Archaeology Officer, Cheshire Archaeology Planning Advisory Service
12.10: “Murgatroyd’s Project” – Kerry Kirwan and Steve Broadfoot, Middlewich Town Council and Heritage Trust
13.00pm to 14.00pm Lunch
14.00: “Aerial Photographing and Mapping in Chester” – Joel Goodchild, Historic England
14.30: Tour of Nantwich – Dr Mike Nevell
15.50: Questions, tea & coffee
16.00: Close

 

 

NWIAC 39 Conference: Excavating the Steam Engine

Fairbottom Bobs c1890The 39th Industrial Archaeology North West conference will be on Friday 27th September at Bolton Museum and then in the afternoon at the Northern Mill Engine Society’s museum. The theme is excavating the steam engine. The programme and online booking link is below.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/excavating-the-steam-engine-tickets-66686764909?ref=estw

The conference is run by our CBA North West Industrial Archaeology Panel. The Panel was first formed in 1959 and then reformed in the late 1970s, so we are celebrating its 60th anniversary this autumn.

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